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Exercise Creates Energy!  

Feel Good - Look Good - Make New Friends!

Find recommendations for your age group at:
http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/index.html

Physical activity can help:
Build and keep your bones and muscles healthy
Improve skin complexion  
Reduce obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Promotes psychological well-being
Sopport academic achievement and good study habits
Improve your concentration, attention, endurance, strength and range-of-motion          

REMEMBER TO STAY WELL HYDRATED WHILE EXERCISING!


The Indiana State Department of Health is requiring all seniors (2015-2016) to have two meningitis vaccines. This is the 2nd year for this requirement. Most students received their first meningitis vaccine in 2010. By the start of the 2015-2016 school year, the second meningitis vaccine is required for all senior students. The rare exception will be if your student had their 1st meningitis vaccine at age 16 or older. These students would only need one meningitis vaccine.

The Kosciusko County Health Department Immunization Clinic will be able to administer your student’s vaccines if your child is: covered by Medicaid, uninsured, or if you have insurance that does not cover the cost of immunizations.  

If you have insurance that covers the cost of immunizations, you can obtain these vaccines by contacting your own physician first. If your physician does not carry vaccinations in their office, you may call Pediatric Healthcare at 574-269-8338 and see if your student qualifies for their service.

If you have any question or need more information please contact your school nurse.


Photo: MMR vaccine. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 23 Mar 2015.
The Indiana State Department of Health School Immunization Requirements for students entering the 6th grade for the 2015-2016 school year are as follows:

3 Hep B (Hepatitis)
5 DTaP  Vaccines (Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussis)
4 Polio Vaccines
2 MMR Vaccines (Measles, Mumps & Rubella)
2 Varicella Vaccines (or history of Chicken Pox documented by a physician)
1 Tdap Vaccine (Tetanus & Pertussis)*
1 Meningitis Vaccine (MCV4)*

(* additional vaccines required for 6th grade students)

The Kosciusko County Health Department Immunization Clinic will be able to administer your student’s vaccines if your child is: covered by Medicaid, uninsured, or if you have insurance that does not cover the cost of immunizations.  

If you have insurance that covers the cost of immunizations, you can obtain these vaccines by contacting your own physician first. If your physician does not carry vaccinations in their office, you may call Pediatric Healthcare at 574-269-8338 and see if your student qualifies for their service.

If you have questions or need more information please contact your school nurse.


Photo: Vaccine. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 23 Mar 2015.
More than 2 million poisonings are reported each year to poison control centers across the country. More than 90 percent of these poisonings occur in the home. The majority of non-fatal poisonings occur in children younger than six years old. Poisonings are also one of the leading causes of death among adults.

National Poison Prevention Week, the third week in March each year, is a week nationally designated to highlight the dangers of poisonings and how to prevent them. However, every day people can and do prevent poisonings. We invite you to review the information from the resources listed below and become actively involved in helping ensure the safety of children and adults in your home and your community.

Poison EMERGENCY
If you or someone you know may have been poisoned, call the toll-free Poison Help line (http://www.poisonhelp.hrsa.gov/what-can-you-do/raise-awareness-about-the-poison-help-line/index.html) right away at 1-800-222-1222, which connects you to your local poison center. If the person is not breathing, call 911. Do not wait for signs of a poisoning before calling the Poison Help line. When you call, you will speak with a poison expert at your poison center. Use this emergency checklist (http://www.poisonhelp.hrsa.gov/what-can-you-do/emergency-checklist/index.html) to guide you on what information to tell the poison expert on the phone.

For 50+ ways to prevent poisonings:  http://www.poisonprevention.org/50plusWaysToPreventPoisonings.pdf

For more resources on poison prevention/safety/education, visit the following websites:
http://www.poisonprevention.org
http://www.PoisonHelp.hrsa.gov

Photo: Poison Prevention Week Council Facebook Cover Photo

Blood donors are heroes! Donating blood can save a life. No chemical, drug or fluid can replace human blood in an emergency. Blood cannot be manufactured. Give the gift of blood.
Blood has a limited shelf life so new donations of all blood types are always needed. Donated blood is separated into three components-red blood cells, platelets, and plasma. Every day about 38,000 units of red blood cells are given to Americans. Unfortunately, the demand for blood exceeds the donation of blood.
Give something you can spare. Call the American Red Cross at 1- 800-733-2767 press 2 or go to redcross.org to find out where and when you can donate. By donating blood, you can save a life!

Image CREDIT

Michelle Del Guercio / Photo Researchers / Universal Images Group

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