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Submitted by Stephenie Lee

It is getting warmer outside and everyone is anxious to get out and soak up some rays. What a great feeling it is to have the sun shining on you. When outside swimming, jogging, gardening, or just playing around, be sure your skin is well protected.
Cloudy days are when people are at most risk of sunburn because they feel that sunscreen is not necessary. The Skin Cancer Foundation reports that up to 80% of the sun’s UV rays pass through clouds making it just as easy to sunburn on overcast days.

Take these steps recommended by the Skin Cancer Foundation to protect your skin and prevent skin cancer:

• Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM.
• Don’t get sunburned. The risk of melanoma doubles if you have more than 5 sunburns over the course of a lifetime.
• Avoid tanning and never use UV tanning beds.
• Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses.
• Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
• Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or after swimming or excessive sweating.
• Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens should be used on babies over the age of six months.
• Examine your skin head-to-toe every month.
• See a dermatologist at least once a year for a professional skin exam.
• Be cautious when taking NSAIDS such as Aspirin, Ibuprofen, and Naproxen. They make you extra –sensitive to the sun so take special care if using these medications while being out in the sun.

Be sure to visit the website www.skincancer.org  for more information relating to skin cancer and ways to prevent and detect it.

   
Submitted by Jeanine DeGeeter

Kindness does matter.
Kindness boosts health. Kindness is contagious. Kindness is free!
One kind word can change someone's entire day.

We invite you and your family to create a culture of kindness. Join in on the "The Great Kindness Challenge."
Make a checklist that might include:
    Compliment someone
    Invite a friend to play
    Help a younger sibling
    Say thank you
    Smile at people
Challenge your family to do kind things. Reward this behavior.
submitted by Lisa Secrist

The Christmas season is now upon us marked with decorated trees, caroling, parties, colorful lights, nostalgic movies, snowy weather, and of course, holiday shopping. It is that time of year when people rush to the stores to buy the latest toys and other gifts to give to their loved ones for Christmas. All the hustle and bustle leads to the anticipation of Christmas morning as we watch our loved ones open the gifts we bought for them.

In all the excitement of buying gifts, it is easy to forget about toy safety. Most injuries from toys are minor cuts, scrapes, and bruises. However, toys can cause serious injury or even death. This happens when toys are used in the wrong way. So before making your toy purchases this year, keep safety in mind, so Christmas can be an enjoyable time instead of a scary memory.

SAFETY SHOPPING TIPS:
Inspect toys before you buy them. Avoid sharp edges, small parts, or loose parts - THINK LARGE so babies and small children don’t choke on small parts. Do not give toys with ropes, cords, or parts that can heat up. Crayons and markers should be labeled non-toxic.

Choose age-appropriate toys. Make sure you choose the right toy for the right age and skill level of the child you are buying for.

Check for the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) label on every toy that proves it meets safety standards. Electronic toys should be “UL” approved. Read warning labels. Teach your child how to use the toy in the right way.

Buy toys that are well-made. Plastic toys should be strong so they won’t break easily. Stuffed toys should have seams and edges that are secure and intact.

Check the Consumer Product Safety Commission website for recalled toys.

Safe toys can be a fun way to interact with your family and friends. Card games, puzzles, board and table games are generally safe choices. So this Christmas season, put away the electronic devices and enjoy playing with safe toys that stimulate creativity, encourages face to face interaction, and creates lasting memories with your family and friends. Make this a safe holiday season by following the tips mentioned above and celebrate this holiday season by spending time with those you love. Merry Christmas and be safe!

www.nationaldaycalendar.com
www.healthychildren.org



Toys. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
quest.eb.com/search/132_1250924/1/132_1250924/cite. Accessed 12 Dec 2018.










Have you ever woken up in the morning with a runny nose and sore throat, then later in the day you start to feel achy and feverish? You might ask yourself “do I have the flu or is it just a cold virus”?

Peak flu season in the U.S. runs from late November through March and because colds and flu share so many common symptoms and are both upper respiratory illnesses, it is often difficult to tell the difference.

Cold symptoms usually start with a sore throat for the first few days, followed by a runny nose, congestion, and cough. These symptoms may continue for 4-5 days. Fever is uncommon in adults, however, children may often have a cold with fever but it is often low. Sneezing is common with the cold and sometimes you may have a little fatigue and chest discomfort but headaches are rare with common colds. Some complications of the common cold are sinus infections and middle ear infections.

Flu symptoms tend to come on suddenly, fever (100-102 degrees, sometimes higher) with severe body aches, chills, headache and severe cough. Sometimes you may have vomiting or diarrhea. The symptoms will usually improve over 2 -5 days for normal, healthy individuals but you may feel weak for another 7-10 days. Flu can pose a serious threat to elderly, the very young and those who are immune compromised or have heart or lung problems. One very serious complication of the flu is pneumonia, which can be life threatening for some individuals.

You might need to see a doctor if you think you have the flu and/or you are experiencing difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, persistent vomiting, confusion or severe headache not associated with fever.

The very best prevention measures to keep healthy this flu and cold season is to wash your hands often. Avoid close contact with someone who has the cold or flu and get the annual flu vaccine as a preventative. Although not 100% effective, often people who have had the vaccine and get the flu, will have a much milder case.

Please stay home from work and school if you think you are having symptoms of the flu so you will be less likely to transmit it to someone else.

For more information on the cold vs. the flu visit CDC.gov/flu or visit webmd.com




Teenager with common cold. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 22 Oct 2018.
quest.eb.com/search/132_1573062/1/132_1573062/cite. Accessed 28 Nov 2018.
Did you miss it? September was National Childhood Obesity Month.

While September may be over this health issue continues to be a serious concern throughout the year especially as we head into the winter months when getting enough exercise can be a mojor problem. There are no easy answers when it comes to childhood obesity but increasing our knowledge and understanding of the contributing factors is a good first step. Check out these great resources which will help you and your child continue on your journey to good health.

www.cdc.gov/features/childhoodobesity/

www.jumpinforhealthykids.org/



Boy On Bike. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. 
quest.eb.com/search/139_1950638/1/139_1950638/cite. Accessed 2 Oct 2018.

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